And now I’m currently all caught up with forewords/afterwords. Here’s the foreword/preface for Expansion Expression, which sort of kicks off the vibe for the novel and the series moving forward. It’s definitely lighter than the other ones. As always, I enjoyed writing and recording it.

Starting with a Party

One, two, three, four, let’s start again, shall we?

Five is a base number, fitting it comes after four, the mysterious fortuitous one. Even more fitting is that five is the number that is emblazoned on the spine of Expansion Expression, book five of the Adventures of the Trinity and the One. Maybe not fitting. It’s obvious, right? Book five has five on it. Wow. Shocking.

It’s really shocking in that awe-inducing way that I made it to book five. Not at all shocking in the bad way or the how could I do this I didn’t

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The last of the first four afterwords/forewords—the one for Of Fractured Edges. This…this one might be the most intense of them, emotionally. Longest as well for sure. Most spoilerific too, so beware.

Divine Shattering

Anytime I try to explain how Of Fractured Edges means to me to anyone, mostly my internal wanderings, I come to this little anecdote. I don’t remember where I heard it or read it first, but to summarize:

When the Game of Thrones TV series was being made, the show runners were just hoping to reach the Red Wedding. They knew they had ‘done’ it when they had given that event of the novels justice in the cinematic form.

Of Fractured Edges is that for me. I know I said Harmonic Waves was like that, but Of Fractured Edges might be the greatest of those moments I needed to show. The one that had …

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Here I am again with the recordings! This is the second of my additions to the novels. How to Stop Wildfire it felt natural to have a preface to explain the journey to it and explain it. With Harmonic Waves, my thoughts lingered on the content and what it meant rather than the journey so I chose to do a retrospection that is at the end of the novel. There are some spoilers within which is all the more reason it needs to be read following the book itself.

Read…or listened to. Yep. I recorded myself again. Enjoy!

Jumping On and On

If How to Stop Wildfire was practice that I could take a shred of story and transform it into something great through modernization and revitalization, Harmonic Waves was the first serious capitalization of that experience. It was the second, the successor of the messy first that …

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This is me reading aloud the new preface before How to Stop Wildfire. Once I get all the books converted Lulu, it will be in the print copy in addition to the new electronic copy version you can get from me.

You can also read it below if you hate listening to recordings like I do:

A Story Before A Story

Once upon a time, there were a few scraps of paper within a notebook that contained a story titled ‘The Creation.’ It had childish humor, a bizarre plot, and characters and ideas very dear to me. It stayed there for many years, gathering dust and the pencil marks slowing fading alway. The memory of it stayed with me, though.

The memory of it and the entire world I had constructed throughout my years. Races. Characters. History.

Stories. So many stories with ‘The Creation’ as just one of …

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The story starts like this:

I write a story.

It takes me many years to get to a point where it is passable. It takes a few more to make me proud of it. It will take less than one afterwards to realize how far I’ve come since it. But we’re not there yet.

I wrote a story and I thought I wanted to share that story. So I shoved into onto sub-par medium (Amazon Kindle) because I hoped everyone would see my care for it. I hoped and hoped and then it never really came, but I didn’t stop writing and growing. It hurt a little to not get the attention, but my writing didn’t need anyone else’s attention on it because it had my own. So I kept going on until I really asked: Why?

I should stop now. I’m rehashing. I’ve gotten over that hurdle. I’m …

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Every character has a face and every writer, at some point, has to engage in the process know as describing character faces. As in, put words to their mental picture of a particular character. Whether that character is ugly, pretty, scarred, plain, or whatever, there needs to be some description of what they look like. And Humans, being so facial-centric, usually focus on the face. It makes sense. I don’t disagree.

Problem is, though, my characters don’t really have, eh, typical faces. Human-like ones, at any rate. Not really a problem, but more of a fact of what I write and love. So let’s see, the main cast and their heads:

  • Cyclone. He wears a helmet. I described his helmet well enough, but what is underneath is bare bones. Literally. His head is a skull. Not much to describe there–and he is barely ever without his helmet so the


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The good days are when I:

  • Can spin a phrase without even trying.
  • Put together dialogue seamlessly.
  • Make only minor mistakes.
  • Plow through a chapter in a sitting.
  • Feel my blood spark with inspiration.
  • Start planning out the future, smiling as I do.
  • Flow through the story and words like I am swimming.
  • Can focus for hours on end.
  • Know exactly where I am going.
  • Create a structure and order that is instantly pleasing.
  • Find the word and phrases to say what I want.
  • Turn my imagination into beautiful prose.
  • Create a product I am proud of.

The bad days are when I:

  • Can’t find the words.
  • Butcher a phrase so that it looses all meaning.
  • Lost in what is happening.
  • Have no drive or passion.
  • Can’t look back or forward.
  • Am conflicted on what to do and where to go.
  • Have neither ideas nor solutions.
  • Spend a few minutes


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Writing, like most things, has a point known by a variety of terms: writing flow and zone are but two of many words and phrases. They mean the state of mind one enters when fully engaged with an activity. When one becomes one with it. Conscious thought is lost to the act of doing. We become so wrapped up in the process that the bigger picture is lost. It is the essence of engaging.

I love this writing flow. It is not what writing is to me, but it is certainly a big part of it. Getting into the groove and not letting up until I hit the end of my thought or section that I fell into completely. It feels substantial and powerful.

It has its downsides, though. Sometimes seeing all the trees is a good thing, but sometimes you really need to see the forest. Planning and careful …

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I haven’t hashed it out that much, but I’m thinking about taking a break of some sort between book 4 and book 5. I don’t know if it’ll be a few months or just a few days, but I’m planning on working on a side-project, The Lost, intently for a little bit. Whether I’ll finish it in this break or not, I don’t know. I just have a feeling that after book 4 I’m going to need to spend some time just thinking and planning–not completely writing.

Why?

Because book 4 marks the end of the first four novels, which are thematically linked. They are like their own complete arc. The next four books are their own set, so I want to be in a fresh, thoroughly planned out mindset for them. Also to give the first four some time to settle. When book 4 comes out, I’m planning on …

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How did you discover you were a writer?

Discover?

Do you mean discover like how Columbus ‘discovered’ the new world? Because he really did not. The Americas were always there. There were people that lived in the world that he ‘found;’ they certainly knew it existed. It had always been there for them as long as they had been. No discovery needed.

In that same way of knowing, I knew that I was a writer and storyteller. It was a simple knowing. A fact of being that was clear as the color of the sky.

I always had stories to tell. Writing is another shape of storytelling, another representation for the same concept.

I wrote my first stories in Legos and scrawled drawings, fueled by pure imagination and thought. Then they took the form of fiction tales written for school assignments and personal pleasure, with the same passionate fire as …

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