Here we are again. This time with the afterword-thing for Threads that Bind the Tempest. This is probably the most disjointed one of the lot, but it makes sense given what Threads that Bind the Tempest is. I could have put this before or after the book, but I put it after. I don’t know. It made sense there.

Of course, I recorded myself reading it.

A Paradoxical Tapestry

Threads was always a part of the title. Threads that Bind was a running title I had for awhile but I needed to work something related to air or wind into the title. That was to keep with the clear elemental motif I had going on. Fire, water, then, this one, air. Earth would follow, but for then it was all wind and air.

So I threw in ‘the Tempest’. I had a title that rolled in a way with all those ‘t’s, was similar to my envisioning of the title and incorporated air.

I had a title that didn’t make much sense. Threads that bind the tempest. What does that mean, concretely? That didn’t really matter. Beyond all notion of sense, it worked. It worked as …

Continue Reading...

Warning: Some Threads that Bind the Tempest allusions

For the first four books in the series, there were clear elemental and color themes. How to Stop Wildfire was red and fire, Harmonic Waves was blue and water, Threads that Bind the Tempest was yellow and wind, and Of Fractured Edges was green and earth. But those are the first four themes: What are the The Adventures of the Trinity and the Ones themes moving forward?

The answer lies clearly within the text of Threads that Bind the Tempest. Four objects, the presumed next major quest of the Trinity and the One, are introduced. If you have read the book and are up to date you know what they are, if not I will not go into much detail. These four objects have a concept attached to them. Not something so concrete like an element, but an idea. These ideas are more readily convertible into the themes moving forward for the series and are more ‘free’ to interpretation.

These ideas are:

Book 5 Book 6 Book 7 Book 8
Expansion Light (Lesser Order) Dark (Lesser Chaos) Containment/Contraction

So how the themes play through in the book are going to …

Continue Reading...

Every character has a face and every writer, at some point, has to engage in the process know as describing character faces. As in, put words to their mental picture of a particular character. Whether that character is ugly, pretty, scarred, plain, or whatever, there needs to be some description of what they look like. And Humans, being so facial-centric, usually focus on the face. It makes sense. I don’t disagree.

Problem is, though, my characters don’t really have, eh, typical faces. Human-like ones, at any rate. Not really a problem, but more of a fact of what I write and love. So let’s see, the main cast and their heads:

  • Cyclone. He wears a helmet. I described his helmet well enough, but what is underneath is bare bones. Literally. His head is a skull. Not much to describe there–and he is barely ever without his helmet so the chances to do so are basically non existent.
  • King. Also wears a helmet. A green bubble-like helmet. Kind of iconic, as described in the first chapter ever. Beneath his helmet has never been described. So far, anyway *gives a shifty gaze and perhaps gestures to Of Fractured Edges.*


Continue Reading...

The good days are when I:

  • Can spin a phrase without even trying.
  • Put together dialogue seamlessly.
  • Make only minor mistakes.
  • Plow through a chapter in a sitting.
  • Feel my blood spark with inspiration.
  • Start planning out the future, smiling as I do.
  • Flow through the story and words like I am swimming.
  • Can focus for hours on end.
  • Know exactly where I am going.
  • Create a structure and order that is instantly pleasing.
  • Find the word and phrases to say what I want.
  • Turn my imagination into beautiful prose.
  • Create a product I am proud of.

The bad days are when I:

  • Can’t find the words.
  • Butcher a phrase so that it looses all meaning.
  • Lost in what is happening.
  • Have no drive or passion.
  • Can’t look back or forward.
  • Am conflicted on what to do and where to go.
  • Have neither ideas nor solutions.
  • Spend a few minutes rearranging the same sentence, watching it disintegrate.
  • Want to crawl up into a ball and not do anything.
  • Get all heated about something I can’t change.
  • Hate myself and everything.
  • Care too much for my own good, so much that I am paralyzed.
  • Create a product that I feel ashamed


Continue Reading...

Writing, like most things, has a point known by a variety of terms: writing flow and zone are but two of many words and phrases. They mean the state of mind one enters when fully engaged with an activity. When one becomes one with it. Conscious thought is lost to the act of doing. We become so wrapped up in the process that the bigger picture is lost. It is the essence of engaging.

I love this writing flow. It is not what writing is to me, but it is certainly a big part of it. Getting into the groove and not letting up until I hit the end of my thought or section that I fell into completely. It feels substantial and powerful.

It has its downsides, though. Sometimes seeing all the trees is a good thing, but sometimes you really need to see the forest. Planning and careful thought is lost to the process of the art. What you have at the end of this stint may not be fully coherent or stable. It could work, but it doesn’t work in conjunction with everything else. The writing flow creates its own paths without regards for the existing pathways.…

Continue Reading...

I haven’t hashed it out that much, but I’m thinking about taking a break of some sort between book 4 and book 5. I don’t know if it’ll be a few months or just a few days, but I’m planning on working on a side-project, The Lost, intently for a little bit. Whether I’ll finish it in this break or not, I don’t know. I just have a feeling that after book 4 I’m going to need to spend some time just thinking and planning–not completely writing.

Why?

Because book 4 marks the end of the first four novels, which are thematically linked. They are like their own complete arc. The next four books are their own set, so I want to be in a fresh, thoroughly planned out mindset for them. Also to give the first four some time to settle. When book 4 comes out, I’m planning on making HTSW perma-free and maybe price dropping Harmonic Waves. So I can market that. I’m also thinking about creating a streamlined four pack of them. Maybe do another editing run on each of them. I don’t know. Just some maintenance/pressing forward ideas. What better time would there be to …

Continue Reading...

There are times when I hit a snag along the line. The internal version, updated every moment, of the world and the events spirals along and maybe goes against what I’ve put forth as canon so far. What I believe is canon conflicts slightly with what is canon in the print. It is never a hard conflict; just like a phrasing stumble that has put me in a bit of a corner.

I get extremely frustrated when this happens. Part of me wants to go back through the already published works and make those tiny spots clearer to what I currently think it should be, but that isn’t a solution–it is a patch up. I don’t work with patches, I work with a continuous narrative. These edges can’t be smoothed out. They need to be worked with to create the entire whole that is the mosaic of my world. Having to work with two ideas, not necessarily mutually exclusive, creates a variety of opportunities for advancement in my own world building and the world itself. I have to flesh out the world to be more than just a few details, to create a whole narrative that encompasses both points and …

Continue Reading...

Life is filled with humor and sadness. Tragedy and absurdity. Drama and dullness. Everything is a part of everything.

So my work reflects that. I think saying that a work should have x tone or be ‘dark,’ is kind of silly, unless you are going for a specifically genre-defined work. And I think it is just too restricting. I can write whatever I want to how I want it to be. So I have humorous sections and really tragic sections. I’m going to use book two, Harmonic Waves, as a primary example of interweaving multiple tones into a coherent work. How to Stop Wildfire really shows this too, but I feel like talking about Harmonic Waves, because I think it shows the maximum applications of my world’s humor and tragedy.

I’ll try to talk about the scenes generally, and not reveal too much spoilers, but there will be spoilers for book two, so please read the book first if you care (which you SHOULD.)


Humor:

So the scene in question is in chapter ‘Drops.’ I feel like this scene is going to be one of those scenes that kind of gives the essence of the Trinity and the …

Continue Reading...

A short list of common writing mistakes that I fall prey to constantly and some thoughts on them. Cause it is good to tell the world what you suck. This is very cathartic. I think every writer should do it. Including people who write but are not ‘writers.’ Showing off your problems so you can improve and so on.

Whatever.

Here we go:

  • Using ‘lied’ instead of ‘laid.’
    • I like how ‘lied’ sounds, but I suppose laid is more correct. Ugh. English.
  • Mis-ordering the syntax of sentences containing ‘with’ if the sentence has a bunch of descriptive subjects/objects.
    • I can’t really give an example without confusing myself or embarrassing myself. Sometimes my sentences can get really gnarly and icky to read. If I get confused, I know I have to gut the particular sentence.
  • Accidentally using ‘Earth’ idioms and euphemisms.
    • I’ve been training myself pretty hard to avoid this mistake, but I fall into its trap occasionally. I have to get into the zone of Empirian dialect, which is pretty easy with dialogue and characters, but when doing ‘dryer’ narration I sometimes mess up.
    • Technically this isn’t a ‘common writing mistake,’ but more of a sci-fi/fantasy writer’s mistake.


Continue Reading...

I’ve rambled about genre before. I’m not going to repeat myself and say what genre is or isn’t or what not.

This is, instead, a vague response to a trend I’ve noticed. I’ve seen a lot of posts recently discussing why science fiction and fantasy are important. How they can help society and such. I don’t disagree with such things on principle. The use of genre can make a theme resonate more. Genre is a device of its own that must be used well so that your story is expressed the way it ought to be. What genre your story is in affects how the story is told and what is being told.

Going back to science fiction, there is one example that show cases its potential for showing the truth of society. That piece of sci-fi is Star Trek. I’ll be referring to The Original Series here, but it doesn’t really matter: I’m not using specifics. The use of setting as a future idealized world allows the show’s narrative to tackle the same topics from a different perspective. Instead of presenting race issues as they existed in the 1960s, they are ignored. It shows a world where the …

Continue Reading...